SHERIFF SALE FAQ

Carly M. Cannon, Foreclosure Deputy, 225-621-8387, ccannon@ascensionsheriff.com
Lisa Nickens, Foreclosure Deputy, 225-621-8630, lnickens@ascensionsheriff.com
Donna Poirrier, Civil Supervisor, 225-621-8675, dpoirrier@ascensionsheriff.com

Where are Sheriff Sale auctions held?
The Sheriff's Sale is located at the Gonzales Court House Annex at 828 South Irma Blvd., Gonzales, La 70737. The sale location for each property is identified by bold red letters and can be located if you open each case title and view the case information.

When is the auction held?
All auctions will be held on Wednesdays at 10:00 o’clock. Auction dates will be advertised in the Gonzales Weekly Citizen, the official newspaper of record.

What is the minimum opening bid?
There are two categories for the minimum opening bid:
  • When the sale is with appraisal the bid must open at two thirds (2/3) of the appraisal amount.
  • When the sale is "without” appraisal the bid must open at “costs”.
What “costs” are included in the minimum bid when sold without appraisal?
Advertising, certificates, docket fees, taxes, locksmith fees, towing and storages and Sheriff’s commission (six percent (6%) of the sales price on Movables or three percent (3%) on Real Estate) and any other costs which may be incurred during the foreclosure process.

Must I bring the entire cash amount to the auction?
Upon successfully bidding on the property, the winning bidder must immediately provide the Sheriff with the full amount of the purchase price paid in cash or a personal check. A letter of credit/guarantee from a bank, which includes the maximum dollar value of credit available, institution name, address, bank official name and signature and phone number, will be accepted. Note: A Letter of Credit/Guarantee is not a letter showing that you have a mortgage available to you. However, this letter allows the successful bidder three business days in which to make necessary transfers of funds.

What does it mean when a property is sold with appraisal?
Under the law, both the plaintiff (the creditor) and the defendant (the debtor) have the right to appoint an appraiser to value the property which is being foreclosed upon if that right was not previously waived by the defendant. Each party who names an appraiser shall deliver the appraisal to the sheriff at least two days, exclusive of holidays, prior to the time of the sale. If the parties do not appoint an appraiser the Sheriff appoints the appraiser.

In a Sheriff’s Sale can I rely on the appraisal supplied by the plaintiff, defendant or the Sheriff?
There is no substitute for viewing and appraising property oneself. All appraisals are nothing more than a reflection of an individual’s opinion of the value of a property. The parties to the litigation have varying interests with respect to appraisal amounts. Ordinarily, a plaintiff hopes for a low appraisal and a defendant hopes for a high appraisal. Since there are varying interests involved, prospective bidders should be aware that appraisals might reflect those interests.

What is Real Estate?
It is land with its improvements and the right to own and use it.

Can I enter the property before I bid?
No access is allowed prior to the auction.

What are Movables?
Anything that is not Real Estate is considered a movable or chattel property. Examples include but are not limited to automobiles, boats, furniture, jewelry, business inventories, art work and musical instruments.

Can I operate the Moveable before I bid?
No vehicle maybe operated prior to the auction. Each movable is sold "As Is Where Is” and all sales are final with no exchanges or refunds.